Are Mitch McConnell & Senate Republicans STILL Blocking Unemployment Relief?

YES

McConnell and Senate Republicans knew this relief would expire in July but wasted months playing politics instead of taking action to bring unemployment relief to millions of Americans.

 

Now, they’re still blocking relief as millions remain out of work due to the pandemic.

March 25:

Congress passes the CARES Act, including expanded unemployment insurance Democrats fought to secure. The law provides an additional $600 per week for out-of-work Americans through July 31

May 15:

The Democratic-led House of Representatives votes to extend the $600 per week federal unemployment insurance boost through the end of 2020. They send the bill to the Senate, where McConnell refuses to bring it to the floor for a vote. 

July 31:

The $600 per week emergency unemployment insurance expires. McConnell still refuses to allow a vote on the House bill to extend that relief,  leaving millions of families facing “hunger, evictions or bankruptcies” in battleground states across the country.

August 1:

Democrats urge McConnell to bring the Senate back into session and work through the weekend until Congress reaches a bipartisan deal to extend unemployment relief. McConnell keeps blocking it.

August 2:

McConnell blocks unemployment relief.

August 3:

McConnell blocks unemployment relief.

August 4:

McConnell blocks unemployment relief.

August 5:

McConnell blocks unemployment relief.

August 6:

McConnell blocks unemployment relief.

August 7:

McConnell blocks unemployment relief.

August 8:

McConnell blocks unemployment relief.

August 9:

McConnell blocks unemployment relief.

August 10:

McConnell blocks unemployment relief.

August 11:

McConnell blocks unemployment relief.

August 12:

McConnell blocks unemployment relief.

August 13:

After blocking unemployment relief for months, McConnell adjourns the Senate for recess through September 8.

August 31:

Senate Republicans allowed federal unemployment relief to expire one month ago today. They are still on recess.

September 8:

After nearly a month on recess, McConnell and Senate Republicans return to Washington but are still refusing to fully extend unemployment relief.

September 10:

McConnell and Senate Republicans are still refusing to fully extend emergency unemployment insurance — instead, they vote to advance a plan that would slash relief in half.

 

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Derivates of Gage Skidmore Photos. CC BY-SA 2.0